National Institutes of Health to Fund PTSD and Alcohol Use Study - Syracuse VA Medical Center
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Syracuse VA Medical Center

 

National Institutes of Health to Fund PTSD and Alcohol Use Study

May 8, 2018

Print Version (MS Word)

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                 

Contact: Robert McLean, Public Affairs Officer                  

Phone:   (315) 425-2422

Mobile:   (315) 956-1394

E-mail:   Robert.Mclean@va.gov

  

National Institutes of Health to Fund PTSD and Alcohol Use Study
Researchers at Syracuse VA Medical Center and Binghamton University to Collaborate
         

 Syracuse, NY- The National Institutes of Health recently announced that it will fund Dr. Kyle Possemato at the Center for Integrated Healthcare at the Syracuse VA Medical Center and Dr. Nadine Mastroleo at Binghamton University to conduct a study that develops an integrated treatment for PTSD and hazardous alcohol use and then tests the effectiveness of this intervention.

The study is expected to begin in July 2018 and will be complete in June 2021. This project will first combine two brief interventions that are known to be helpful to veterans, one for PTSD and one for hazardous alcohol use, into one integrated intervention. Veterans with PTSD often struggle with drinking too much so providing treatment for both concerns at the same time is ideal.

Researchers will then test the integrated intervention to understand how veterans may benefit from it. Veterans from the Syracuse, Binghamton and Buffalo VA primary care clinics will be recruited to the study. “Offering treatment for PTSD and unhealthy drinking within the primary care clinic can increase access to services. Veterans often report drinking to cope with their PTSD so offering a brief integrated treatment for both concerns can help veterans get the care they need,” said Dr. Possemato.


For more information on this study or the Center for Integrated Healthcare at the Syracuse VA Medical Center, visit https://www.mirecc.va.gov/cih-visn2 .

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