Syracuse VA Medical Center Using Germ-Zapping Robots to Fight Infections - Syracuse VA Medical Center
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Syracuse VA Medical Center

 

Syracuse VA Medical Center Using Germ-Zapping Robots to Fight Infections

February 9, 2018

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                            

For More Information

Robert McLean, VAMC, PAO

315-425-2422 (O) 315-956-1394 Mobile

 

                                                                  
Syracuse VA Medical Center Using Germ-Zapping Robots to Fight Infections
 
The Xenex LightStrike Uses Intense Germicidal Ultraviolet Light to Kill Germs That Cause Most Hospital Acquired Infections

  

Syracuse, NY-The Syracuse VA Medical Center has incorporated a new futuristic looking technology in the fight to keep Veterans and staff safe from hospital borne infections and diseases.

The Medical Center recently began using a Xenex LightStrike® Germ-Zapping Robot™ as part of an extensive facility-wide battle against germs. This, 5 feet 2 inch tall, high-tech robot harnesses the power of a xenon lamp to create pulses of intense germicidal ultraviolet light (UV) light, which is completely safe for Veterans and staff, that kills germs that cause most hospital acquired infections. The portable room disinfection system is effective against even the most dangerous superbugs and multi-drug resistant organisms (MDRO), including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Clostridium difficile (C. diff), VRE, norovirus and influenza.

Several peer studies have shown the effectiveness of the pulsed xenon UV in reducing pathogens from the environment and from hospitals that reported a decrease in patient infection rates when the pulsed xenon UV technology was used to disinfect rooms.

Although all hospital rooms are thoroughly cleaned by hospital staff wearing proper protection equipment and using cleaning chemicals, harmful bacteria, viruses and fungi can still linger in some areas, especially those human hands can't reach. The light emitted by the Xenex robot can reach into these areas and disinfect a room in 4 to 8 minutes.

“We are working with our infection control staff to track an anticipated reduction of hospital acquired infections resulting from the use of this machine to disinfect patient rooms and other areas of the facility,” said Jeffery Gamble, Syracuse VA EMS manager.

Gamble said that, while this new technology is being used at other hospitals and VAs, around the country, the Syracuse VA Medical Center is the only Central New York facility where it is in use.

“This system will be a valuable part of our facility-wide, aggressive approach to maintaining a clean healthy environment for our Veteran patients, staff and visitors,” said Gamble.

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